CUSTOMERS INCLUDED: BOOK REVIEW

I’ll confess I shelved this book for a quite while after receiving a copy in the mail from its co-author, Phil Terry.  It was the title and subtitle that provoked the initial—and as it turned out, mistaken!—reaction: this is not

THEY: AN ANSWER

GARY LLOYD at CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS      Confrontational art proved itself alive and well at California State University Channel Islands, where the Art Department sponsored an installation and accompanying performance by Gary Lloyd last Thursday, March 13, in a

GARY LLOYD: A Pre-Review

Today I yield space to my friend, the artist Gary Lloyd.  I have known Gary and followed his work for more than forty years.  It was an exhibition of his work in the early 1970s that originated my migration from

JUST DO IT

Okay, I know that’s a cliche.  Worse, perhaps, it’s a cliche born of a sneaker commercial.  But how often do you hear some other person–or yourself!–say something like this: “I’ll try to make it by eight o’clock,” or “I’m trying

AND WHILE I’M AWAY…

… I’ll write home every day, and send all my loving to you. It’s the Beatles, of course.  This was 1964.  Writing home every day meant an actual piece of paper and an envelope, with address and stamp.  A trip

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Despite its unquestionable power, I left this movie troubled as much by what I felt to be a false note as by its indictment of the cruelties of slavery, whose dreadful heritage still haunts the American conscience and scars the American soul.

SEARCHING, SEARCHING…

The Richard Diebenkorn exhibition at the Palm Springs Art Museum is an inspiration and a revelation for anyone interested in watching the creative mind at work.  It covers only a relatively brief period of the artist’s work, “The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966,” but they are

The Sound of Things Falling: Book Review

Just finished The Sound of Things Falling, a novel by the Colombian writer Juan Gabriel Vasquez.  In the translation, at least, it’s a beautifully written story exploring the aftermath of drugs overlord Pablo Escobar’s baleful reign over much of that

DR. JOHNSON’S LONDON: Book Review

You can be sure that 250 years from now, our medical practices and procedures will seem as ignorant, our medications as risible and primitive as do those of 250 years ago. I’m reading Liza Picard’s delightful Dr. Johnson’s London: Everyday

KYLIE’S HEEL: Book Review

Had I not opened up the email from a publicist, I might have missed Susan K. Perry’s first novel, Kylie’s Heel — and that would have been a shame. I opened the email because I recognized the author’s name from

REFLECTIONS ON SILVER RIVER: Book Review

I’m gong back to the beginning of Ken McLeod’sReflections on Silver River: Thirty-Seven Practices of a Bodhisattva and reading it again.  Slowly.  I “read through” it first because I wanted to write this review.  But “reading through” this book doesn’t do

BLUE JASMINE, FRUITVALE STATION, AND ME

(A review of Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine” intended as a sequel to my recent post about “Fruitvale Station.”) What is it about Woody Allen and me? I went with friends to see <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/BlueJasmineMovie” target=”_hplink”>Blue Jasmine</a>, his new movie, this